Facts About Berry Sports Center

  • Built - 1986
  • Dimensions - 88,400 square feet
  • Seating Capacity - 2100 Fans


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Built in 1986, the 88,400 square foot Berry Sports Center contains
varsity basketball and volleyball facilites and national and international squash and racquetball courts. The open atrium and skylights provide natural lighting throughout the facility.

The Berry Sports Center racquetball and squash court area consists of 10 international squash courts (one of which is a glass enclosed exhibition court), two North American squash courts and three racquetbll courts. The squash courts are home to the Dartmouth men's and women's squash teams. The courts were dedicated in November of 1987. The Racquet Center features the Herrick Court, one of only three permanent exhibition courts in North America with three glass walls. The building's architecture is one of its most striking features, as a large skylight brightens the interior and gives the building and court area an expansive feel.

Since its opening as one of the premier squash facilities in the country, Dartmouth has hosted the men's and women's Intercollegiate Squash Association Championships four times - in 1988, 1991, 1997 and 2005 - as well as the national junior championship three times, most recently in 1996. Men's and women's professional tournaments and several exhibitions and clinics have also been held in the Berry Center.

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Leede Arena

The Berry Sports Center was dedicated on May 22, 1987 in honor of John W. Berry ’44 whose $5 million gift was the largest ever made to Dartmouth athletics until the recent gift of $10 million by Douglas C. Floren ’63 and his family for the new varsity house that opened in November 2007. Another gift by Mr. Berry enabled construction to begin in 1985. The basketball arena in the Berry Center is named in honor of Edward Leede ’49 and his family. Mr. Leede is among Dartmouth’s all-time leading scorers and was captain of the 1948-49 team. The Berry Center includes Leede Arena, a 2,100-seat basketball pavilion; two additional regulation basketball courts; four varsity locker rooms; squash and racquetball courts, and the athletic ticket office. At the right is the scene in sold-out Leede Arena for the North Carolina game in 1998. Another capacity crowd packed Leede in 2000 to see the Big Green host Virginia. Large crowds are the norm for Ivy League games, especially when Penn and Princeton come to town.